• Icescapes, 2013 – 2014

    Icescapes looks at how the process of photography can communicate three-dimensional spaces and reinterpret our focus on materials. The work is influenced by the history of the landscape and objectivity within photography. Recently moving to Montana from Washington DC, I immediately noticed a clear struggle between the idyllic landscapes surrounding the town and the industrial space created by our occupation. These visual dualities incited various reactions within my mind and I began to consider ways in which I could deal with this new and intriguing space. For this series, I was looking for ways to construct scenes through new and accessible components. I have used household items placed in molds that are then frozen. The variety of textures, colors and striking features become apparent as the ice structure begins to disintegrate. Photographs are taken during various melting phases of the ice. Throughout the process the synthetic materials begin to mimic natural formations. The ephemeral nature of the material references the fragility of the natural world and our impact upon it within a brief time period in relation to its existence without humankind. Each Icescape can also be seen as a new object. Displayed with a plain white background, the images mimic still lives and product photography. This process isolates the objects and removes their sense of scale. There becomes a challenge of perception, which disembodies each material from its known context. In addition, it has a relation to similar temporal materials used in traditional still life and nature morte, where the chosen items demonstrate decay and the wealth of commodities. The variety of textures and colors in the ice works are made from cheaply made toys, party items, souvenirs, and decorative household goods that were mostly purchased at dollar stores. The objects suspended in the ice bare a negative connection to our current culture with its wealth of temporal commodities and the lack of power that they reference. This opposes the traditional views presented in nature morte and traditional still lives, which are prideful displays of power and wealth.
  • Cycles, 2013

    Within my current bodies of work, Cycles, many of the materials used to create the works are cheap and easily accessible.   A variety of textures and colors are produced by the use of cheaply made toys, party items, souvenirs, and decorative goods.  In all the works organic materials are used and integrated throughout the plastic synthetic amalgams. The Cycle objects are shown in slow and repetitive motion.  The materials begin to be immersed within pools of dense colored fluid to the point that they can no longer be seen.  Once it seems the object are invisible, the videos are looped back to their original phases. Shown in a barren space, a sense of scale and known context of the materials is removed.  With the videos’ trance-like movements and expansive and foggy audio components, these videos seem be living or least had life at one time. In this series of work, the objects can have a negative connection to our current culture with its wealth of temporal commodities and the lack of power that they reference.  The moving imagery in the Cycles can be seen as a reference to ocean gyres that collect high concentrations of plastic and chemical debris. Throughout the process of the work the synthetic materials begin to mimic natural formations.  The ephemeral nature of the material references the fragility of the natural world and our impact upon it within a brief time period in relation to its existence without humankind. In conclusion, Cycles are about the duality of images.  There are multiple ways of interpreting the as landscape, object or artifact.  These works are studies: a new way of identifying our relationship with ideas of the natural and the artificial, the beautiful and the repulsive.
  • Cycles, 2013

    Within my current bodies of work, Cycles, many of the materials used to create the works are cheap and easily accessible.   A variety of textures and colors are produced by the use of cheaply made toys, party items, souvenirs, and decorative goods.  In all the works organic materials are used and integrated throughout the plastic synthetic amalgams. The Cycle objects are shown in slow and repetitive motion.  The materials begin to be immersed within pools of dense colored fluid to the point that they can no longer be seen.  Once it seems the object are invisible, the videos are looped back to their original phases. Shown in a barren space, a sense of scale and known context of the materials is removed.  With the videos’ trance-like movements and expansive and foggy audio components, these videos seem be living or least had life at one time. In this series of work, the objects can have a negative connection to our current culture with its wealth of temporal commodities and the lack of power that they reference.  The moving imagery in the Cycles can be seen as a reference to ocean gyres that collect high concentrations of plastic and chemical debris. Throughout the process of the work the synthetic materials begin to mimic natural formations.  The ephemeral nature of the material references the fragility of the natural world and our impact upon it within a brief time period in relation to its existence without humankind. In conclusion, Cycles are about the duality of images.  There are multiple ways of interpreting the as landscape, object or artifact.  These works are studies: a new way of identifying our relationship with ideas of the natural and the artificial, the beautiful and the repulsive.